Diversity in the Notarial Archives: Cuban and Latin American Communities

The records of the Clerk of Civil District Court’s Office, which date back to the 1700s, represent the rich history of New Orleans and its diverse communities. Our archives can be used for property, family history, architectural, and landscaping research.

Jose (Joseph) Quintero, Lamar Quintero, and John Marshall Quintero, Notaries

The Quintero family is one example of the generations of notaries that can be found in the collection. Jose (Joseph) Quintero, the patriarch, immigrated to the United States from Cuba. He established a notarial practice in New Orleans around 1866. Later, his sons would join the profession. They served the New Orleans community, specifically catering to Latin American and Cuban New Orleanians as well as individuals residing in Cuba and Latin American countries.

Jose (Joseph) Agustin Quintero.
http://www.latinamericanstudies.org/quintero.htm

Jose (Joseph) Quintero

Jose (Joseph) Agustin Quintero, also known as Joseph Quintero, was born is Havana, Cuba, in 1829. As an adolescent he attended Harvard University in Massachusetts. He returned to Havana where he graduated from law school. After his graduation, he pursued a career in journalism during the Cuban patriot revolution. Quintero was arrested multiple times by the Spanish and was condemned to death for his writings in favor of revolution against the Spanish. He was taken to Morro Castle in Havana, as a political prisoner and purportedly escaped.1

Morro Castle, located on Havana Bay in Havana, Cuba. Photo credited to Locally Sourced Havana Tours.
https://havanatourcompany.com/morro-castle-cuba/

After Quintero fled Cuba, he settled in the southern region of the United States and enlisted in the Quitman Rifles guard in Austin, Texas. His political writings expressed sympathy for the South during the Civil War because he felt “Cuban patriots fighting for liberation from Spain [they] tended to identify the Southern cause with revolutionary struggle.”1

After the Civil War, Quintero settled in New Orleans where he married and had two sons, Lamar and John Marshall. He graduated from a law school in the city and pursued a career in law and notarial work. Soon after, his career interest shifted back to journalism, and he became an editor for the New Orleans Picayune. In addition to these accomplishments, Quintero later served as the American Consul for Belgium and Costa Rica.1

His notarial acts include two volumes ranging from 1866-1868 and 1874-1880. His acts are written in English and Spanish.

On October 28, 1867, Quintero executed an act of consent to marriage. The act, pictured below, is of Domino Bornio y Calonge consenting to the marriage between his daughter, Amalia Bornio, and Martin del Escobal.

Quintero, Joseph A. 1867 October 28. Vol 1, Act 93A. Courtesy Hon. Chelsey Richard Napoleon, Clerk of Civil District Court, Parish of Orleans.

This 1877 contract below is between George W. Leonard of the firm Leonard and Maxwell. He declared that the firm bargained, agreed, and contracted to sell Genaro de la Vega of Havana, Cuba, “…five hundred mules, …four to eight years of age…to be well broken to the saddle.”

This act is an example of Quintero catering to and serving the Cuban community.

Quintero, Joseph. 1877 April 22. Vol 2, Act 59. Courtesy Hon. Chelsey Richard Napoleon, Clerk of Civil District Court, Parish of Orleans.

On September 7, 1885, Joseph Quintero passed away in the presence of his family, including his sons, Lamar Quintero and John Marshall Quintero.

Times-Picayune, 8 Sept. 1885, p. 4. NewsBank: America’s News – Historical and Current.

Lamar Quintero

Lamar Quintero was born September 7, 1862. He received his education at Jesuit College and received a law degree from Tulane in 1890. Like his father, Quintero worked for the New Orleans Picayune and was appointed vice-consul of the Republic of Costa Rica. In 1891, he became the Consul-General for the South. In 1908, the Quintero brothers and another individual, Donelson Caffery, formed a law firm.2 The Notarial Archives houses John Marshall’s acts from 1894 to 1918.

Times-Picayune, 31 Oct. 1921, p. 1. NewsBank: America’s News – Historical and Current.

The survey below is an attached plan, which is annexed to, or included with, the notarial act and then bound into the volume. On June 26, 1900, Frank H. Waddill, Deputy City Surveyor, created the survey that indicates an irregular portion of ground in the First District, Square No. 182 bounded by Lee Circle, St. Charles, St. Joseph, Camp, and Howard.

Quintero, Lamar. 1901 January 3. Vol 4, Act 1. Courtesy Hon. Chelsey Richard Napoleon, Clerk of Civil District Court, Parish of Orleans.

Shown below is an act of sale from Clara May, et al. to Louis Fairchild, on January 3, 1901.

Quintero, Lamar. 1901 January 3. Vol 4, Act 1. Courtesy Hon. Chelsey Richard Napoleon, Clerk of Civil District Court, Parish of Orleans.

Quintero executed a wide variety of documents, one of which pertains to an act of marine protest. In an act of marine protest, a claimant makes an initial statement, known as a marine note of protest, regarding trouble at sea and conditions that were beyond the vessel’s control. The marine note of protest is annexed to the act of marine protest, which is a complete statement that is given at a later date.

On March 7, 1901, the master of a schooner named Clover appeared before Lamar Quintero to give his initial statement. The image below is the marine note of protest, which is included as a supporting document to the act.

Attachment of a Marine Note of Protest. Quintero, Lamar. 1901 March 7. Vol 4, Act 54. Courtesy Hon. Chelsey Richard Napoleon, Clerk of Civil District Court, Parish of Orleans.

The master of the schooner, Gus Christensen, detailed the full sequence of events as shown below in the act of marine protest.

Quintero, Lamar. 1901 March 7. Vol 4, Act 54. Courtesy Hon. Chelsey Richard Napoleon, Clerk of Civil District Court, Parish of Orleans.

From both documents, it can be surmised that Clover left Chiltepec, Mexico, carrying a cargo of 121 mahogany logs on February 22, 1901.

Strong gusts and gales of wind commenced just before midnight on the 22nd. Around 2 A.M. on February 23rd, the schooner lurched so heavily that it shifted the deck-load. It was also revealed that Clover developed a considerable leak. Pumps were used to prevent the water from gaining. By the 25th, the vessel encountered more intense storms, causing more water intake and the breaking of the main-rail. By March 3rd, Clover had reached the mouth of the Mississippi River. A tugboat, Napoleon, was requested to tow the vessel to the wharf at the Otis Saw Mill, which is located near Madisonville, along the Tchefuncte River.

Otis House located on the Tchefuncte River, in Madisonville, LA, site of the Otis Saw Mill
https://www.louisianatravel.com/articles/otis-house-fairview-riverside-state-park

Otis House, as pictured above, was the family home of saw mill owner and architect, William Theodore Jay.3 He is known for building the President’s House at Tulane University.4

John Marshall Quintero

Times-Picayune, 30 Nov. 1960, p. 10. NewsBank: America’s News – Historical and Current.

John Marshall Quintero, the second son of Joseph Quintero, was born in 1871. Like his brother, he attended Jesuit College. He worked for the postal department of the U.S. government before he began practicing law in 1902. He specialized in civil and international law. Quintero became the vice-consul for Costa Rica in 1906, and eventually became Consul-General, taking the place of his late brother, Lamar Quintero.

The Research Center houses John Marshall Quintero’s forty-two notarial volumes ranging from 1902 to 1960. There are eight volumes dedicated to notarial acts written in Spanish.

As displayed below, John M. Quintero executed an act of donation on March 15, 1917, in which Mr. Maximo Rosales donated a farm to his expressed legitimate children. The farm, San Agustin, was located in Namasigue, Department of Choluteca, Honduras.

Quintero, John M. 1917 Mar 14. Vol 3, Act 12. Spanish Acts. Courtesy Hon. Chelsey Richard Napoleon, Clerk of Civil District Court, Parish of Orleans.

In another act, Mathilda De Arguedas, age 17, without a father or mother, appeared before John Quintero and said that pursuant to Article 343 of the Civil Code of the Republic of Guatemala, she agrees to appoint Mr. Carlos J. Perret, of Guatemala City, Republic of Guatemala, as her guardian. The act was passed on April 5, 1918.

Quintero, John M. 1918 Apr 5. Vol 3, Act 94. Courtesy Hon. Chelsey Richard Napoleon, Clerk of Civil District Court, Parish of Orleans.

The Quintero family are representative of the ethnically diverse notaries whose plans and documents can be located in the Research Center.

The Clerk’s Office has a rich history pertaining to Cuban and Latin American Communities. If there are any particular interests that you would like to learn more about, please contact the Clerk’s Office. We are happy to assist.

Sources:

1. Tucker, Phillip Thomas. Cubans in the Confederacy: José Agustín Quintero, Ambrosio José Gonzales, and Loreta Janeta Velazquez. McFarland, 2002.

2. Times-Picayune, 31 Oct. 1921, p. 1. NewsBank: America’s News – Historical and Current.

3. https://www.louisianatravel.com/historic-districts-sites/otis-house-museum

4. https://www.nola.com/archive/article_bbf54dba-3258-5954-b2a1-0a50d2526d3e.html

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Create your website at WordPress.com
Get started
%d bloggers like this: